Flooring Sample Gallery Denver, CO

Browse Our Excellent Quality Hardwood Flooring

Flooring is the most important, yet sometimes overlooked, part of the decor in any home or office. It literally sets the stage for a beautiful interior view, especially when you take advantage of the many exciting options for hardwood flooring at MacDonald Hardwoods.

We are proud to offer you a wide selection of hardwood flooring, as well as some basic information to help make the design and purchasing process fun, creative and easy.

For example, there are two distinct sections of the trunk of a tree, the heartwood and the sapwood layers.

  • Heartwood – The inner, darker section of the tree that contains less moisture and retains most of its size upon drying. Heartwood is formed from the older sapwood and is the strongest part of the tree. Heartwood is not as susceptible to fungal decay.
  • Sapwood – Contains a lot of moisture, shrinks when dried, and is somewhat susceptible to fungus. Sapwood is the outer, lighter colored wood that sap flows through. It’s often to referred to as the “working” part of the tree.

To learn more about the characteristics of hardwoods, click on the wood swatches below to get details about that specific selection, including hardness, stability, color and more. Visit our hardwood floor store to see more design ideas and talk to our friendly hardwood flooring pros!

ASH-WHITE

COLOR: Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is creamy white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow.
GRAIN: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsawn boards.
HARDNESS/JANKA: 1320; 2% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Above average (change coefficient .00274; 26% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Elastic, hard; excellent shock resistance. Remains smooth under friction.

BEECH

COLOR: Heartwood is mostly reddish brown; sapwood is generally pale white.
GRAIN: Mostly closed, straight grain; fine, uniform texture. Coarser than European beech.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1300; 1% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Below average (change coefficient. 00431; 17% less stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Elastic, hard; excellent shock resistance. Wears well and stays smooth when subjected to friction – popular for commercial floors.

BIRCH

COLOR: In yellow birch, sapwood is creamy yellow or pale white; heartwood is light reddish brown tinged with red. In sweet birch, sapwood is light colored and heartwood is dark brown tinged with red.
GRAIN: Medium figuring, straight, closed grain, even texture. Occasional curly grain or wavy figure in some boards. SIDE HARDNESS/JANKA: 1260 (yellow); 2% softer than Northem red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Average (change coefficient .00338; 8% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: ard and stiff; very strong, with excellent shock resistance.

CHERRY BLACK

COLOR: Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown, lustrous; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood resulting in a more uniform color.
GRAIN: Fine. Frequently wavy. Uniform texture. Distinctive flake pattern on true quartersawn surfaces. Texture is satiny with some gum pockets.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 950; 26% softer than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Above average (change coefficient .00248; 33% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Strong, moderately hard; excellent shock resistance. Usually considered too soft for an entire floor – mostly used for borders and accents..

DOUGLAS FIR

COLOR: Heartwood is yellowish tan to light brown. Sapwood is tan to white. Heartwood may be confused with that of Southern yellow pine. Radical color change upon exposure to sunlight.
GRAIN: Normally straight, with occasional wavy or spiral texture. Nearly all fir flooring is vertical-grain or riftsawn clear-grade material.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 660; 49% softer than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Above average (change coefficient .00267; 28% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Durable but easily dented. Somewhat brittle and splinters easily, especially with age. Used for flooring, but may not be suitable for all applications due to its softness.

HEART PINE – ANTIQUE

COLOR: Heartwood is yellow after cutting and turns deep pinkish tan to warm reddish brown within weeks due to high resin content. Sapwood remains yellow, with occasional blue-black sap stain.
GRAIN: Dense, with high figuring. Plainsawn is swirled; rift- or quartersawn is primarily pinstriped. Curly or burl grain is rare.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1225; 5% softer than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Above average (change coefficient .00263; 29% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Natural resistance to insect infestation in heartwood; dense.

HICKORY/PECAN

COLOR: Pecan heartwood is reddish brown with dark brown stripes; sapwood is white or creamy white with pinkish tones. Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines.
GRAIN: Pecan is open, occasionally wavy or irregular. Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; somewhat rough-textured.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1820; 41% harder than Northern red oak. Pecan is slightly softer than true hickories. DIMENSIONAL STABIUTY: Pecan, average (change coefficient .00315; 15% more stable than red oak). Hickory, below average (change coefficient .00411; 11 % less stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Combination of strength, hardness, toughness and stiffness found in no other commercial wood; exceedingly high in shock resistance.

Maple – Sugar/Hard

COLOR: Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white.
GRAIN: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fid­dleback, curly or bird’s-eye figuring. Figured boards often culled during grading and sold at a premium.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1450; 12% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Average (change coefficient .00353; 4% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Dense, strong, tough, stiff; excellent shock resistance – often used in bowling alleys and athletic facilities. Markedly resistant to abrasive wear.

Oak – Red

COLOR: Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak.
GRAIN: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattem, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, some­times called tiger rays or butterflies.
HARDNESS (JANKA): Northern 1290 (benchmark).
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Average (change coefficient .00369).
DURABILITY: Stiff and dense; resists wear with high shock resistance, though less durable than white oak.

Oak – White

COLOR: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream.
GRAIN: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occassional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or but­terflies.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1360; 5% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Average (change coefficient .00365; 1% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: More durable than red oak. Tannic acid in the wood protects it from fungi and insects.

Pine – Southern Yellow

COLOR: Heartwood varies from light yellow/orange to reddish brown or yellowish brown; sapwood is light tan to yellowish white.
GRAIN: Closed, with high figuring; patterns range from clear to knotty.
HARDNESS (JANKA): Loblolly and shortleaf 690, 47% softer than Northern red oak; longleaf 870, 33% softer than N. red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Above average (change coefficient .00265; 28% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Soft, fairly durable, although not as resis­tant to scuffs, dents and abrasions as the hardwoods. Often used for flooring, but may not be suitable for all applications due to its softness.

Walnut – American Black

COLOR: Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great; some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color.
GRAIN: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or curly grain. Arrangement of pores is similar to hickories and persimmon; but pores are smaller in size.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1010; 22% softer than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00274; 26% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Moderately dense, very strong, good shock resistance. Not as dent-resistant as oak.

Brazilian Cherry

COLOR: Sapwood is gray-white; heartwood is salmon red to orange-brown when fresh, and becomes rus­set or reddish brown when seasoned; often marked with dark streaks.
GRAIN: Mostly interlocked; texture is medium to rather coarse.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 2350; 82% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Average (change coefficient .00300; 19% more stable than red oak). However, actual installations have demonstrated significant movement in use.
DURABILITY: Dense and very strong.

Cypress – Australian

COLOR: Cream-colored sapwood; heartwood is honey-gold to brown with darker knots throughout.
GRAIN: Closed.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1375; 6% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00162; 56% more stable than red oak). How­ever, actual installations have demonstrated significant movement in use.
DURABILITY: Excellent.

Jarrah

COLOR: Heartwood is uniformly pinkish to dark red, often a rich, dark red mahogany hue, turning a deep brownish red with age and exposure; sapwood is pale. Frequent black streaks with occasional in­grown grain.
GRAIN: Frequently interlocked or wavy. Texture is even and moderately coarse.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1910; 48% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Below average (change coefficient .00396; 7% less stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Dense and very strong; high resistance to wear.

Merbau

COLOR: Heartwood is yellowish to orange-brown when freshly cut, turning brown or dark red-brown upon exposure.
GRAIN: Straight to interlocked or wavy; coarse texture.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1925: 49% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00158; 57% more stable than red oak). How­ever, actual installations have demonstrated significant movement in use.
DURABILITY: Strength is comparable to hickory, but density is somewhat lower.

Padauk – African

COLOR: Heartwood is vivid reddish orange when freshly cut, darkening to reddish- or purple-brown or black over time. Sapwood is cream-colored. Very uniform in color.
GRAIN: Straight to interlocked; coarse texture.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1725; 34% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00180; 51% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Average to high durability.

Purpleheart

COLOR: Heartwood is brown when freshly cut, turning deep purple to purplish brown over time. Sapwood is a lighter cream color.
GRAIN: Usually straight; medium to fine texture.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1860; 44% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00212; 43% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Very strong and dense.

Teak – Thai/Burmese

COLOR: Heartwood vartes from yellow-brown to dark golden brown; turns rich brown under exposure to sunlight. Sapwood is a lighter cream color.
GRAIN: Straight; coarse, uneven texture.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1000; 22% softer than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00186; 50% more stable than red oak).
DURABILITY: Strength values are similar to those of American oak.

Wenge

COLOR: Heartwood is yellow-brown when freshly cut, turning dark brown to almost black with alternate layers of light and dark. Sapwood is yellowish-white and clearly demarcated from heartwood.
GRAIN: Straight when quartersawn; coarse texture.
HARDNESS (JANKA): 1630; 26% harder than Northern red oak.
DIMENSIONAL STABILITY: Excellent (change coeffi­cient .00201; 46% more stable than red oak). How­ever, actual installations have demonstrated significant movement in use.
DURABILITY: Average.

  Sample images are 3/4-by-2 1/4-inch square-edge solid strip. Top portion is finished with water-based urethane; bottom with oil-modified polyurethane.

Contact MacDonald Hardwoods at 800.639.3006, today to speak with a flooring professional.